The Nexus Between Work and Faith

Another fascinating entry in the To Whom Is Given series by Values & Capitalism, called "Business as a Work of Justice."

Having a job is a very gratifying feeling, even when it seems like a grind. So how can employees benefit from the contribution they give and feel the reward of a job well done?

According to this group of educators, business and religious leaders, leaders have social capital, but they also get pulled away from the responsibility that comes with great success.

"There is something about employment that lifts the countenance up and makes someone feel like they're fully in God's image.And that is something that a business can do," said Gregory Alan Thornbury, philosopher and president of King's College in New York City.

"Don't forget justice, and using it what you've earned to share opportunity with others who may not have the same blessing that you have," says Christopher Brooks, a Detroit pastor and radio host.

Watch the video and let us know what you think about the biblical commands to entrepreneurs.

Comments (1)
No. 1-1
sconnell1791
sconnell1791

The great thing about a free market economy is that one can gain wealth by serving others, rather than by extorting or oppressing them. As George Mason University professor and economist Walter Williams noted:

“Prior to capitalism, the way people amassed great wealth was by looting, plundering and enslaving their fellow man. Capitalism made it possible to become wealthy by serving your fellow man.”

Some may merely have their own profits on their minds when creating products for the market, but they do provide a social good for those who partake in that product or service.

Dr. Thornbury did have an excellent point, though, that more of us would be wise to consider: that entrepreneurs should consider the fact that humans are made in the image of God when in the marketplace. With that in mind, it changes the quality of work that we do, and offers something more than just material benefit.