Kind edit

Yep edit what dddd

“Big Data” has become one of the tech sector’s most beloved (and frequently abused) buzzwords. Although everyone and their grandmother seems to be “into” big data, few people can provide a solid example of how large-scale data analysis can actually be used. IBM, one of the major players in big data, realized this and set out to show, not tell, how big data can make people’s lives better in a case study focusing on the Memphis police department. Rather than waxing lyrical about its impressive technology, or bombarding the reader with technical specifications, IBM took an alternative approach by telling a story; in this case, the struggles experienced by Larry Godwin, Director of Police Services for the Memphis P.D (PDF). Just as effective PPC ads appeal to prospective customers’ desire to solve problems, the IBM case study outlines Godwin’s difficulties in fighting crime in light of a dwindling budget, rising crime rates and an increasingly cynical populace, before explaining how the application of IBM’s predictive analysis technology helped the Memphis P.D. become more effective by identifying areas in which criminal activity was more concentrated – but not necessarily related in a way that officers may have been able to piece together. Why It Works IBM understood that producing a bland, corporate puff piece wouldn’t win them any customers or pique people’s curiosity about predictive data analysis. Most people don’t care about how the technology works – they’re more interested in what it does. By showing how its technology had a direct impact on the lives of Memphis citizens, IBM highlights the potential of predictive analytics and grounds the story in the lives and struggles of real people. • Chevrolet – ‘100 Years of Icons’ Some of the best examples of long-form content come from brands. Case in point, Chevrolet’s “100 Years of Icons,” a journey through time with one of America’s most instantly recognizable brands. Beginning in 1914 with the Royal Mail Roadster, the article chronicles not only the development of new automotive technologies during the past century, but also the unique position the Chevrolet brand occupies in American culture. The piece features striking images of Chevy’s most iconic vehicles to accompany the surprisingly modest copy, including photos of classic models like the El Camino, Camaro and Corvette. Why It Works This example is particularly clever, as it not only provides gearheads with lots of information about the specifications of each vehicle (including horsepower, the number of cylinders each engine had and the sticker value at the time of release), it also reinforces the concept of longevity – not just of the Chevrolet brand, but of the manufacturer’s individual vehicles. By taking the reader on a journey through the brand’s history, Chevrolet appeals to consumers’ desire for a reliable and stylish car in an entertaining and informative way. • Patagonia – ‘Climbing in Iceland with Loki the Deceiver’ Patagonia is one brand that really “gets” long-form content. Although Patagonia is essentially just another activewear apparel brand, its content strategy sets it apart from its competitors. Posts like this example perfectly demonstrate how providing interesting long-form content can be genuinely compelling and a great way to build a brand. In “Climbing in Iceland with Loki the Deceiver,” Kitty Calhoun, proprietor of women’s ice and rock climbing organization Chicks Climb, tells the story of how she and three other climbers embarked on an adventure to the heart of the Icelandic wilderness. The post reads like a professional travelogue, and is accompanied by photos taken by Calhoun and her traveling companions, each revealing a glimpse of Iceland’s grandeur and mystery to the reader. Far from a self-indulgent tale of a glamorous winter sports expedition, Calhoun’s post reveals the difficulties she and her fellow climbers experienced during their trip, including brutal weather conditions, dangerous climbs and the trepidation that comes with braving the unknown – all classic ingredients of a compelling story. “Big Data” has become one of the tech sector’s most beloved (and frequently abused) buzzwords. Although everyone and their grandmother seems to be “into” big data, few people can provide a solid example of how large-scale data analysis can actually be used. IBM, one of the major players in big data, realized this and set out to show, not tell, how big data can make people’s lives better in a case study focusing on the Memphis police department. Rather than waxing lyrical about its impressive technology, or bombarding the reader with technical specifications, IBM took an alternative approach by telling a story; in this case, the struggles experienced by Larry Godwin, Director of Police Services for the Memphis P.D (PDF). Just as effective PPC ads appeal to prospective customers’ desire to solve problems, the IBM case study outlines Godwin’s difficulties in fighting crime in light of a dwindling budget, rising crime rates and an increasingly cynical populace, before explaining how the application of IBM’s predictive analysis technology helped the Memphis P.D. become more effective by identifying areas in which criminal activity was more concentrated – but not necessarily related in a way that officers may have been able to piece together. Why It Works IBM understood that producing a bland, corporate puff piece wouldn’t win them any customers or pique people’s curiosity about predictive data analysis. Most people don’t care about how the technology works – they’re more interested in what it does. By showing how its technology had a direct impact on the lives of Memphis citizens, IBM highlights the potential of predictive analytics and grounds the story in the lives and struggles of real people. • Chevrolet – ‘100 Years of Icons’ Some of the best examples of long-form content come from brands. Case in point, Chevrolet’s “100 Years of Icons,” a journey through time with one of America’s most instantly recognizable brands. Beginning in 1914 with the Royal Mail Roadster, the article chronicles not only the development of new automotive technologies during the past century, but also the unique position the Chevrolet brand occupies in American culture. The piece features striking images of Chevy’s most iconic vehicles to accompany the surprisingly modest copy, including photos of classic models like the El Camino, Camaro and Corvette. Why It Works This example is particularly clever, as it not only provides gearheads with lots of information about the specifications of each vehicle (including horsepower, the number of cylinders each engine had and the sticker value at the time of release), it also reinforces the concept of longevity – not just of the Chevrolet brand, but of the manufacturer’s individual vehicles. By taking the reader on a journey through the brand’s history, Chevrolet appeals to consumers’ desire for a reliable and stylish car in an entertaining and informative way. • Patagonia – ‘Climbing in Iceland with Loki the Deceiver’ Patagonia is one brand that really “gets” long-form content. Although Patagonia is essentially just another activewear apparel brand, its content strategy sets it apart from its competitors. Posts like this example perfectly demonstrate how providing interesting long-form content can be genuinely compelling and a great way to build a brand. In “Climbing in Iceland with Loki the Deceiver,” Kitty Calhoun, proprietor of women’s ice and rock climbing organization Chicks Climb, tells the story of how she and three other climbers embarked on an adventure to the heart of the Icelandic wilderness. The post reads like a professional travelogue, and is accompanied by photos taken by Calhoun and her traveling companions, each revealing a glimpse of Iceland’s grandeur and mystery to the reader. Far from a self-indulgent tale of a glamorous winter sports expedition, Calhoun’s post reveals the difficulties she and her fellow climbers experienced during their trip, including brutal weather conditions, dangerous climbs and the trepidation that comes with braving the unknown – all classic ingredients of a compelling story. “Big Data” has become one of the tech sector’s most beloved (and frequently abused) buzzwords. Although everyone and their grandmother seems to be “into” big data, few people can provide a solid example of how large-scale data analysis can actually be used. IBM, one of the major players in big data, realized this and set out to show, not tell, how big data can make people’s lives better in a case study focusing on the Memphis police department. Rather than waxing lyrical about its impressive technology, or bombarding the reader with technical specifications, IBM took an alternative approach by telling a story; in this case, the struggles experienced by Larry Godwin, Director of Police Services for the Memphis P.D (PDF). Just as effective PPC ads appeal to prospective customers’ desire to solve problems, the IBM case study outlines Godwin’s difficulties in fighting crime in light of a dwindling budget, rising crime rates and an increasingly cynical populace, before explaining how the application of IBM’s predictive analysis technology helped the Memphis P.D. become more effective by identifying areas in which criminal activity was more concentrated – but not necessarily related in a way that officers may have been able to piece together. Why It Works IBM understood that producing a bland, corporate puff piece wouldn’t win them any customers or pique people’s curiosity about predictive data analysis. Most people don’t care about how the technology works – they’re more interested in what it does. By showing how its technology had a direct impact on the lives of Memphis citizens, IBM highlights the potential of predictive analytics and grounds the story in the lives and struggles of real people. • Chevrolet – ‘100 Years of Icons’ Some of the best examples of long-form content come from brands. Case in point, Chevrolet’s “100 Years of Icons,” a journey through time with one of America’s most instantly recognizable brands. Beginning in 1914 with the Royal Mail Roadster, the article chronicles not only the development of new automotive technologies during the past century, but also the unique position the Chevrolet brand occupies in American culture. The piece features striking images of Chevy’s most iconic vehicles to accompany the surprisingly modest copy, including photos of classic models like the El Camino, Camaro and Corvette. Why It Works This example is particularly clever, as it not only provides gearheads with lots of information about the specifications of each vehicle (including horsepower, the number of cylinders each engine had and the sticker value at the time of release), it also reinforces the concept of longevity – not just of the Chevrolet brand, but of the manufacturer’s individual vehicles. By taking the reader on a journey through the brand’s history, Chevrolet appeals to consumers’ desire for a reliable and stylish car in an entertaining and informative way. • Patagonia – ‘Climbing in Iceland with Loki the Deceiver’ Patagonia is one brand that really “gets” long-form content. Although Patagonia is essentially just another activewear apparel brand, its content strategy sets it apart from its competitors. Posts like this example perfectly demonstrate how providing interesting long-form content can be genuinely compelling and a great way to build a brand. In “Climbing in Iceland with Loki the Deceiver,” Kitty Calhoun, proprietor of women’s ice and rock climbing organization Chicks Climb, tells the story of how she and three other climbers embarked on an adventure to the heart of the Icelandic wilderness. The post reads like a professional travelogue, and is accompanied by photos taken by Calhoun and her traveling companions, each revealing a glimpse of Iceland’s grandeur and mystery to the reader. Far from a self-indulgent tale of a glamorous winter sports expedition, Calhoun’s post reveals the difficulties she and her fellow climbers experienced during their trip, including brutal weather conditions, dangerous climbs and the trepidation that comes with braving the unknown – all classic ingredients of a compelling story. Editing the ghhhjjn jjjjjjapp

Comments (7)
No. 1-7
ios704
ios704

Editor

ios reply aiden and see the ios notification wheter can fetch

Aiden
Aiden

I upload a new avatar. can you show it?

Aiden
Aiden

Me tooo show my name I am aiden

zoeyTheMaven
zoeyTheMaven

show my name because i reply it

ios704
ios704

jsjkskd